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Tuesday 30 May 2023

My Coffee Pot Book Club Guest: I. M. Foster - Murder On Oak Street


Welcome to my Blog!
Wander through wonderful worlds
real and fictional,
meet interesting people,
visit exciting places
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About the Book
Book Title: Murder on Oak Street
Series:  A South Shore Mystery
Author: I. M. Foster
Publication Date:  November 4, 2022
Publisher:  independent
Page Length: 503
Genre: Historical Mystery

Blurb: 
New York, 1904. After two years as a coroner’s physician for the city of New York, Daniel O'Halleran is more frustrated than ever. What’s the point when the authorities consistently brush aside his findings for the sake of expediency? So when his fiancée leaves him standing at the altar on their wedding day, he takes it as a sign that it's time to move on and eagerly accepts an offer to assist the local coroner in the small Long Island village of Patchogue.

Though the coroner advises him that life on Long Island is far more subdued than that of the city, Daniel hasn’t been there a month when the pretty librarian, Kathleen Brissedon, asks him to look into a two-year-old murder case that took place in the city. Oddly enough, the case she’s referring to was the first one he ever worked on, and the verdict never sat right with him.

Eager for the chance to investigate it anew, Daniel agrees to look into it in his spare time, but when a fresh murder occurs in his own backyard, he can’t shake his gut feeling that the two cases are connected. Can he discover the link before another life is taken, or will murder shake the peaceful South Shore village once again?

Buy Links:
This title is available to read with #KindleUnlimited.
Universal Link:
Amazon UK:
Amazon US:
Amazon CA:
Amazon AU:


ABOUT THE AUTHOR
I. M. Foster is the pen name author Inez Foster uses to write her South Shore Mystery series, set on Edwardian Long Island. Inez also writes historical romances under the pseudonym Andrea Matthews, and has so far published two series in that genre: the Thunder on the Moor series, a time-travel romance set on the 16th century Anglo-Scottish Borders, and the Cross of Ciaran series, which follows the adventures of a fifth century Celt who finds himself in love with a twentieth century archaeologist.

Inez is a historian and librarian, who love to read and write and search around for her roots, genealogically speaking. She has a BA in History and an MLS in Library Science and enjoys the research almost as much as she does writing the story. In fact, many of her ideas come to her while doing casual research or digging into her family history. Inez is a member of the Long Island Romance Writers, the Historical Novel Society, and Sisters in Crime.

Social Media Links:
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Read An Excerpt

Murder on Oak Street
“I’ll not have it, I tell ye,” Thomas yelled as Colin stormed out of his study, nearly knocking Patrick down. “This will be the end o’ it!”
The end of what? Patrick closed the front door behind him and peeked toward his stepfather’s study. He’d barely had time to turn around, however, when Colin strode back across the entrance hall and grabbed him by the arm.
“I’ll deal with you later,” his stepbrother said before he swung the front door open and stormed out, leaving Patrick momentarily stunned.
Thomas’s harsh voice brought him back to his senses, and he looked up to see his stepfather standing in the doorway of his study, the vein in his neck bulging through his skin.
“I want to see you as well. In here! Now!”
Could word of his tryst with Lydia have reached him so soon? He would have to pay the piper dearly for this. Still, he would do it all again in the breath of an instant. The love he’d felt in those brief moments would last in his heart for an eternity. Nothing Thomas did to him could take that away.
Having resigned himself to the inevitable reprisal, he took a deep breath and answered his stepfather’s summons. Thomas had already returned to sit in the large leather chair behind his desk, and so, as usual, Patrick took up his position in front of it, trying desperately to stifle a sigh. In truth, he thought he may as well simply head out to the stables and brace himself for a beating. The thought of it sickened him, but he convinced himself that it would probably be no more than the strap this time and breathed a bit easier.
“And where have you been this afternoon?” Thomas asked, the sarcasm in his voice palpable.
Patrick suppressed a moan. Did they really have to play this game? They both knew where he’d been. Why bother with the formalities? Still, there was a chance, however faint, that his stepfather had not heard the entire story, and so Patrick went along with it.
“I went to Mrs. Langston’s, for my piano lesson. You instructed me to do so, if you recall, Father. She sent a message, I believe.”
“And ye had yer lesson, then, did ye?”
“Yes, of course.” Thomas’s hand flung through the air with such speed, Patrick never saw it coming, and he staggered with the force of the blow when it smacked into his face. Wrong answer, he thought to himself. The old reprobate did already know.
“Do ye think me a complete fool?” Thomas said, his watery gray eyes bulging with anger. “I came across the lady in town earlier today, and she knew nothing of yer appointment.”
Patrick was not sure what to say. If Thomas somehow didn’t know about Lydia yet, the chances were slim that he would remain in the dark about that little detail forever, but for the moment he decided to risk another blow and plead innocent.
“Nor did I, sir, not until I arrived. When I found she wasn’t at home, I simply assumed there’d been a misunderstanding and decided to ride my bicycle for a bit, being it was such a lovely day and all.”
“Ye took a ride, did ye? For the entire afternoon? And where did this leisurely ride lead ye? To some gambling den, no doubt, so ye could spend more of me hard-earned money, or maybe past a neighbor’s stable to satisfy yer more visceral instincts?”
Patrick hung his head as if he were ashamed, hoping that his stepfather would take it as an affirmation of his whereabouts.
“O’ course!” Thomas grumbled. “What else could I expect? Well, which was it? Shall I feel it in me pocket, or should I expect a visit from an infuriated summer resident whose daughter has just become acquainted with your charms?”
“It was my own money, sir.” Might as well go with that for a change, though he rarely visited the gambling hells.
“Was it, now? And how much did ye lose?”
“No more than fifteen dollars or so, I think.”
“Fifteen dollars! Well, seeing as ye have such an abundance o’ money to throw away, I guess ye won’t be needing yer allowance for the next three weeks. It will be donated instead to a local charity.”
“But Father . . .” Patrick gritted his teeth. Calling this charlatan that still grated on his nerves.
“Ye’ve an objection to donating yer money to the orphanage? What would yer dear mother think?”
“No, sir!” Patrick said. Let it go. You’re getting off easy. Don’t give him any reason to rethink this.
“Very well, then, ye’re dismissed, but the next time ye come across such a situation, ye’re to come directly home. Is that understood?” Patrick gave a polite nod and began to leave, but Thomas was not quite through with him. “Oh, and by the way, lad, since ye chose to feign this morning’s liaison with Mrs. Langston, perhaps ye should make it up to her by taking an extra piano lesson next week. ’Tis yer punishment for being so deceitful. Lord help me, ye’re as big a liar as Colin, but always remember one thing. Colin is me son, and that fact alone warrants a certain degree of leniency. One that ye do not require.” 


Helen's Honest Review

Murder On Oak Street:

As a Brit, apart from Colonial Williamsburg, San Francisco, a hotel in Denver where I attended a conference, and a small patch of North Carolina, I have no idea of places in the USA. I have, though, spent a few days in Long Island, so although not over-familiar with the location at least I've been there.

I.M. Foster has written an historical-based mystery containing drama and some intriguing characters, not all of whom are nice people. I liked Daniel O'Halleran right from the start. He is a frustrated New York coroner, and when circumstances give him a push to change direction in his life (I'm giving away no spoilers) he moves to Long Island where life, he assumes, will be less complicated, slower and more congenial for his personal and professional circumstances. But, of course, this is a murder mystery, so events dictate his future and interest as the new coroner.

The research seemed to be good, although I did, out of curiosity, find myself checking Wikipedia every so often. Were telephones in use at this time (1904), for instance? Yes they were! That is the joy of reading good historical fiction, however, providing the facts are correct, it's amazing what you can learn.

I found the first dozen or so chapters somewhat slow and repetitive regrading the unpleasant goings-on within the family; too many scenes were slightly akin to 'Groundhog Day', and a little implausible. Would someone as beaten-up, mentally and physically, as poor Patrick was really be able to go out on long bicycle rides or have sexual encounters? These chapters were more about Patrick's story and the conflict with his manipulative stepfather. I got the picture, didn't need the repeated bullying or 'encounters'.

As he had been introduced first (and features as predominant in the book's blurb) I wanted O'Halleran's story as the ongoing main interest - I'd have rather seen him going about his medical duties as the main storyline during these opening chapters, with glimpses into Patrick's life, not the other way round.

I would have appreciated more sense of 'place' description as well, as I was none the wiser of what Long Island or New York looked, smelled or felt like in the early 1900s. 

Having said all that, the story eventually picked up and gathered pace, which then kept going nicely. An interesting start to a new series, and any future investigations for O'Halleran should be worth looking out for.

Helen Hollick
4 star 
* * * * 

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You might also like 

books written by Helen Hollick 

Website: https://helenhollick.net/

Amazon Author Page: https://viewauthor.at/HelenHollick 

The Jan Christopher Cosy Mysteries
set in the 1970s

*

The SEA WITCH VOYAGES
nautical adventures set during the Golden Age of Piracy

If you liked Pirates Of The Caribbean?
then you'll love the Sea Witch Voyages!
Amazon:
 https://viewbook.at/SeaWitch


A prequel novella - how Jesamiah Acorne became a pirate 
COFFEE POT BOOK CLUB ANNUAL AWARD 2022



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Thursday 25 May 2023

My Coffee Pot Book Club Guests ... and Alternate Endings

A short story collection of historical 'what ifs'

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meet interesting people,
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About the Book

Book Title: Alternate Endings – A Short Story Anthology of Historical What Ifs

Publication Date: November 1st, 2022

Publisher: Historical Writers Forum 

Page Length: 360

Genre: alternate history

A Short Story Anthology of Historical What Ifs

by Salina B Baker, Stephanie Churchill (Foreword), Sharon Bennett Connolly, Elizabeth Corbett, Virginia Crow, Cathie Dunn, Karen Heenan, Michael Ross, and Samantha Wilcoxson

We all know the past is the past, but what if you could change history?

We asked eight historical authors to set aside the facts and rewrite the history they love. The results couldn’t be more tantalizing.

What if Julius Caesar never conquered Gaul?

What if Arthur Tudor lived and his little brother never became King Henry VIII?

What if Abigail Adams persuaded the Continental Congress in 1776 to give women the right to vote and to own property?

Dive in to our collection of eight short stories as we explore the alternate endings of events set in ancient Rome, Britain, the United States, and France.

An anthology of the Historical Writers Forum.

 Buy Links:

This title is available to read on #KindleUnlimited.

Universal Link:  https://mybook.to/AltEnd

Amazon UK: 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0BKC33GFX

Amazon US: 

https://www.amazon.com/Alternate-Endings-Short-Anthology-Historical-ebook/dp/B0BKC33GFX/

Amazon CA: 

https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B0BKC33GFX

Amazon AU: 

https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B0BKC33GFX

About the Authors:

Samantha Wilcoxson
Samantha Wilcoxson is an author of emotive biographical fiction and strives to help readers connect with history's unsung heroes. 

She also writes nonfiction for Pen & Sword History. Samantha loves sharing trips to historic places with her family and spending time by the lake with a glass of wine. Her most recent work is Women of the American Revolution, which explores the lives of 18th century women, and she is currently working on a biography of James Alexander Hamilton.

Website

Sharon Bennett Connolly
Historian Sharon Bennett Connolly is the best-selling author of five non-fiction history books, with a new release coming soon.

A Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, Sharon has studied history academically and just for fun – and has even worked as a tour guide at a castle. She writes the popular history blog, www.historytheinterestingbits.com. 

Sharon regularly gives talks on women's history; she is a feature writer for All About History magazine and her TV work includes Australian Television's 'Who Do You Think You Are?'

Website

Cathie Dunn
Cathie Dunn writes historical fiction, mystery, and romance. The focus of her historical fiction novels is on strong women through time.

She loves researching for her novels, delving into history books, and visiting castles and historic sites.

Cathie's stories have garnered awards and praise from reviewers and readers for their authentic description of the past.

Website

Karen Heenan
As an only child, Karen Heenan learned early that boredom was the enemy. Shortly after she discovered perpetual motion, and has rarely been seen holding still since.

She lives in Lansdowne, PA, just outside Philadelphia, where she grows much of her own food and makes her own clothes. She is accompanied on her quest for self-sufficiency by a very patient husband and an ever-changing number of cats. 

One constant: she is always writing her next book.

Website

Salina B Baker
Salina Baker is a multiple award winning author and avid student of Colonial America and the American Revolution. 

Her lifelong passion for history and all things supernatural led her to write historical fantasy. Reading, extensive traveling and graveyard prowling with her husband keep that passion alive. 

Salina lives in Austin, Texas.

Website

Virginia Crow
Virginia Crow is an award-winning Scottish author who grew up in Orkney and now lives in Caithness.

Her favourite genres to write are fantasy and historical fiction, sometimes mixing the two together. Her academic passions are theology and history, her undergraduate degree in the former and her postgraduate degree in the latter, and aspects of these frequently appear within her writings.

When not writing, Virginia is usually to be found teaching music. She believes wholeheartedly in the power of music, especially as a tool of inspiration, and music is often playing when she writes. Her life is governed by two spaniels, Orlando and Jess, and she enjoys exploring the Caithness countryside with these canine sidekicks.

She loves cheese, music, and films, but hates mushrooms.

Website

Elizabeth K Corbett
Elizabeth K. Corbett is an author, book reviewer, and historian who has recently published a short story, “Marie Thérèse Remembers.” She is currently working on her debut novel, a gothic romance set in Jacksonian America.

When she is not writing, she teaches academic writing, something she is very passionate about. She believes in empowering students to express themselves and speak their truth through writing. Additionally, she is a women’s historian who studies the lives of women in eighteenth and nineteenth century North America. Mostly, she is fascinated by the lives of the lesser known women in history.

A resident of gorgeous coastal New Jersey, she takes inspiration from the local history to write her historical fiction. She is an avid reader who adores tea and coffee.

Website

Stephanie Churchill
After serving time as a corporate paralegal in Washington, D.C., then staying home to raise her children, Stephanie Churchill stumbled upon writing, a career path she never saw coming.

As a result of writing a long-winded review of the book Lionheart, Stephanie became fast friends with its New York Times best-selling author, Sharon Kay Penman, who uttered the fateful words, “Have you ever thought about writing?” 

Stephanie’s books are filled with action and romance, loyalty and betrayal. Her writing takes on a cadence that is sometimes literary, sometimes genre fiction, relying on deeply-drawn and complex characters while exploring the subtleties of imperfect people living in a gritty, sometimes dark world.

She lives in the Minneapolis area with her husband, two children, and two dogs while trying to survive the murderous intentions of a Minnesota winter.

Website

Michael Ross
Best selling author Michael Ross is a lover of history and great stories. He's a retired software engineer turned author, with three children and five grandchildren, living in Newton, Kansas with his wife of forty years. He was born in Lubbock, Texas, and still loves Texas.

Michael attended Rice University as an undergraduate, and Portland State University for his graduate degree. He has degrees in computer science, software engineering, and German. In his spare time, Michael loves to go fishing, riding horses, and play with his grandchildren, who are currently all under six years old. 

Website

Connect with Historical Writers Forum:

Twitter: 

https://twitter.com/HistWriters

Facebook: 

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100063689944203


Follow the Tour

Twitter Handle: @HistWriters @cathiedunn

Instagram Handle: @thecoffeepotbookclub

Hashtags: #HistoricalFiction #anthology #ShortStories #AlternateHistory #BlogTour #TheCoffeePotBookClub

Tour Schedule page:  

https://thecoffeepotbookclub.blogspot.com/2023/04/blog-tour-alternate-endings-anthology.html



*** *** 

You might also like 

books written by Helen Hollick 

Website: https://helenhollick.net/

Amazon Author Page: https://viewauthor.at/HelenHollick 

 
1066 Turned Upside Down -
an anthology of alternative stories
* * *
The Jan Christopher Cosy Mysteries
set in the 1970s

* * *
Amazon: FREE ebook!


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Tuesday 23 May 2023

My Coffee Pot Book Club Guest: Lucretia Grindle - The Devil’s Glove


Welcome to my Blog!
Wander through worlds
real and fictional,
meet interesting people,
visit exciting places
and find good books
to enjoy along the way!


About the Book

Book Title: The Devil’s Glove

Series: Salem

Author: Lucretia Grindle

Publication Date: May 1, 2023

Publisher: Casa Croce Press

Page Length: 346

Genre: Literary Historical Fiction

Northern New England, summer, 1688.
Salem started here.

A suspicious death. A rumor of war. Whispers of witchcraft.

Perched on the brink of disaster, Resolve Hammond and her mother, Deliverance, struggle to survive in their isolated coastal village. They're known as healers taught by the local tribes - and suspected of witchcraft by the local villagers.

Their precarious existence becomes even more chaotic when summoned to tend to a poisoned woman. As they uncover a web of dark secrets, rumors of war engulf the village, forcing the Hammonds to choose between loyalty to their native friends or the increasingly terrified settler community.

As Resolve is plagued by strange dreams, she questions everything she thought she knew - about her family, her closest friend, and even herself. If the truth comes to light, the repercussions will be felt far beyond the confines of this small settlement.

Based on meticulous research and inspired by the true story of the fear and suspicion that led to the Salem Witchcraft Trials, THE DEVIL'S GLOVE is a tale of betrayal, loyalty, and the power of secrets. Will Resolve be able to uncover the truth before the town tears itself apart, or will she become the next victim of the village's dark and mysterious past?

 

Praise for The Devil’s Glove:

“From its opening lines this historical novel from Grindle (Villa Triste) grips with its rare blend of a powerfully evoked past, resonant characters, smart suspense, and prose touched with shivery poetry.”

~ BookLife Reviews Editor’s Pick

 


Read An Excerpt

Excerpt from The Devil’s Glove

 The bushes thin. The top of the point is so windy and salt-blown that not much can grow here. Judah walks beside me. Water is all around us, below the prow of the rocks, and on either side. She stops and cocks her head. Strands of hair have come loose from her cap and whip across her face.

       “What is that smell?”

       Back at our cove, it was still. But here the wind has taken up residence, as if this is its true home. I can smell salt, and sun on the rocks. Then, lifting my nose like a hound, I realize she is right. There is something. Something rotten.

        At the very top of the point enough soil has collected to let a small stand of sea oaks to sink their roots. Their leaves dance and clatter, clinging to their twisted arms, which look for all the world as though they are raised above their heads in alarm. As well they might be. Because as we turn towards them, we see what lies at the heart of their tiny grove.

       At first, I think it is just bunches of wilted flowers weighed down with stones.  Sea roses, still crimson, their petals curling like babies’ fists. The bruised purple-blue smudges of monkshood. All laid in a circle inside the small wind-twisted trees. I do not understand what is at their center. Stepping closer, I see that it is long and bedraggled, and even in this wind, covered in flies. It is a fish, I think. Or a dead sea bird. Then I realize I am wrong.

        I reach out to stop Judah, but I am too late. She steps forward, then gasps as she jumps back and we stand, side by side, looking down at the ravaged body of a small orange cat.

           “Percy,” Judah whispers, and I nod.

         We all knew that Avis Hobbs’ cat was no better disciplined, no less given to wandering, than her child. But he was a sweet thing. Perching on the window sill, he would watch you, then jump down into your lap if you were spinning or sitting to card wool or mend. He followed me more than once, when I went to do our milking. I sometimes poured a bowl for him and left it under the lavender bank in the garden where it would stay cool even in the mid-day sun. Avis doted on him. She would walk up Broad Street and around the common and down to the harbor calling for him, then when she found him, lift him and carry him home like a baby, telling him to mend his wicked ways.

           Some creature has been at him. What is left of his pretty orange fur is matted horribly, although his little white gloves are still bright and clean. For some reason, this brings tears to my eyes. It is clear that Percy has been dead for some time. Some of the flowers are fresher than others. I am certain the most recent are the ones I saw Abigail carrying yesterday. 

                                                                         ***

Judah and I leave the point quickly, trotting when we can as the track descends and finally widens. We barely speak until we reach the birch grove. I think both of us know we are going to fetch my mother. We never consider telling anyone else. I know that too, because our minds scurry, as we do, side by side. The only choice would be George Burroughs. Again without speaking of it, I know we both touch upon the idea - flit across it the way a butterfly flits across warmed stone - then reject it, and hurry on, heads bowed.

     Our hands brush as we come down off the point into the birches. Our fingertips feel for each other, as if we are reassuring ourselves that warm live flesh will meet warm live flesh because, no matter what we have just seen, we are still in the world of men.

      My mother is in the stillroom. Her morning’s work – the plants she has cut or been given in trade - are laid along the work bench. Some of the branches and long stalks are already tied, ready to be hung from the rafter hooks. Sunlight from the single window falls on her hands as she works. Her head turns at the sound of us, but her fingers keep stripping leaves and straightening stems. At the sight of our faces, they stop.

                                                                 ***    

We brought Percy back from the point, laid in a basket my mother bedded with mint to mute the stink. Now, Judah wields the spade. When the hole is deep enough, it is my mother who bends and places the little cat, shrouded in one of her old aprons, in the earth. When the soil has been shoveled back and smoothed, she looks from me to Judah.

         “We will say nothing of this. Not to anyone. Not a word.”

      Both of us nod. We do not need to be warned. We understand that there is something larger here, the thing that made us fetch her in the first place. I have found a big, flat stone. I lay it on the fresh earth so no fox, or ring-tailed coon, or village dog can dig poor Percy up. It does not hurt that it also disguises the newly-dug grave.

        Judah must return to work. Our expedition took far longer than it should have, and the Ingersolls will be looking for her. I walk with her as far as the common, which is empty now, and stand watching her weave down Broad Street through clumps of militia men who have finished their marching for the morning and will soon be looking for beer. I tell myself that I am keeping an eye on her, waiting until she is safely back at The Ordinary. But in truth, I think I am watching for Abigail Hobbs, hoping to see that she is still nothing but a child.                                         ***

      That evening, my mother lifts the kettle, which has boiled. The wilted bouquets were not the only things we found up on the point with Percy. When my mother lifted him, she found several scraps of cloth, old bits of quilt that looked suspiciously like the one Avis Hobbs was wrapped in when she died. In the grass beside the little cat’s body, she spotted a stub of burned tallow, and a small, cracked, wooden bowl. Which she now fills with boiling water.

        My mother replaces the kettle on its hook and sets the little bowl on the hearth. We watch as the wood swells and seals. She bends and, without touching it, sniffs. Then she dabs her finger in what is now cloudy liquid, and raises it to meet the tip of her tongue.

       “Hellebore. Soaked in milk.” She looks back at the bowl. “I might have thought,” she says slowly, “still, that Avis’ death could have been an accident. I would have thought so, if not for this.”

           Silence hangs between us. We look to the bowl as if it might speak. Which, in its way, it has.

           “The cat did not die there,” my mother says finally, “where you found him. He would have been nothing but bones, if scavengers left anything at all. She brought him, after she used him as a test for the hellebore. She must have done it at the house and hidden him, then brought him there, with the bowl, so neither would be found at the death cleaning.”

           “But they were. I mean, we found them, on the point.”

           “But not in the house. And by accident” my mother says.

           The small flames of the fire flicker and dance. Their shadows finger her face, heightening the gold in her eyes.

           “Or fate,” she adds a moment later. “The turn of the world. God’s will.” She looks at me. “We are all instruments, intended to do what we must do. A day more, and something would have taken him. Nothing would have been left but the bowl, which would have cracked and rotted and returned to the earth. Then no one would have thought a thing, about the death of Avis Hobbs.”

        No one but you, I think. Again, I see my mother stopping on the threshold of the fetid room. Why did they not use charcoal? She had asked.

         Because, I think answering her now, Goody Skilling is twisted around her own importance. But she has no gift. She could not see what was before her, and if she’d had her way, if George Burroughs had not come for us, Avis Hobbs would have slipped from life unremarked. And Abigail would be known as nothing but her golden haired poppet, skipping through the world.

            Reading my mind, my mother nods. Then she picks up the little wooden bowl and throws it on to the fire.

Buy Links:

This title is available to read on #KindleUnlimited.

Universal Link:  https://books2read.com/u/4EN58l

Amazon UK: 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0BWSD5SVL/

Amazon US: 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0BWSD5SVL/

Amazon CA: 

https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B0BWSD5SVL/

Amazon AU: 

https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B0BWSD5SVL/

About the Author:

Author Bio:

Lucretia Grindle grew up and went to school and university in England and the United States. After a brief career in journalism, she worked for The United States Equestrian Team organizing ‘kids and ponies,’ and for the Canadian Equestrian Team. For ten years, she produced and owned Three Day Event horses that competed at The World Games, The European Games and the Atlanta Olympics. In 1997, she packed a five mule train across 250 miles of what is now Grasslands National Park on the Saskatchewan/Montana border tracing the history of her mother’s family who descend from both the Sitting Bull Sioux and the first officers of the Canadian Mounties.

Returning to graduate school as a ‘mature student’, Lucretia completed an MA in Biography and Non-Fiction at The University of East Anglia where her work, FIREFLIES, won the Lorna Sage Prize. Specializing in the 19th century Canadian West, the Plains Tribes, and American Indigenous and Women’s History, she is currently finishing her PhD dissertation at The University of Maine. 

Lucretia is the author of the psychological thrillers, THE NIGHTSPINNERS, shortlisted for the Steel Dagger Award, and THE FACES of ANGELS, one of BBC FrontRow’s six best books of the year, shortlisted for the Edgar Award. Her historical fiction includes, THE VILLA TRISTE, a novel of the Italian Partisans in World War II, a finalist for the Gold Dagger Award, and THE LOST DAUGHTER, a fictionalized account of the Aldo Moro kidnapping. She has been fortunate enough to be awarded fellowships at The Hedgebrook Foundation, The Hawthornden Foundation, The Hambidge Foundation, The American Academy in Paris, and to be the Writer in Residence at The Wallace Stegner Foundation. A television drama based on her research and journey across Grasslands is currently in development. THE DEVIL’S GLOVE and the concluding books of THE SALEM TRILOGY are drawn from her research at The University of Maine where Lucretia is grateful to have been a fellow at the Canadian American Foundation. 

She and her husband, David Lutyens, live in Shropshire.

Social Media Links:

Website: http://LucretiaGrindle.com

Facebook: 

https://www.facebook.com/BookWhisperer.ink

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Instagram: 

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Amazon Author Page: 

https://www.amazon.com/author/lucretiagrindle

Goodreads: 

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/827521.Lucretia_Grindle

 Follow the Tour

Twitter Handle: @cathiedunn

Instagram Handle: @bookwhispererink @thecoffeepotbookclub

Hashtags: #TheDevilsGlove #HistoricalFiction #Salem #BlogTour #TheCoffeePotBookClub

Blog Tour Page:  https://thecoffeepotbookclub.blogspot.com/2023/04/blog-tour-the-devils-glove.html



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You might also like 

books written by Helen Hollick 

Website: https://helenhollick.net/

Amazon Author Page: https://viewauthor.at/HelenHollick 

 
The Jan Christopher Cosy Mysteries
set in the 1970s

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The SEA WITCH VOYAGES
nautical adventures set during the Golden Age of Piracy


A prequel novella - how Jesamiah Acorne became a pirate 
COFFEE POT BOOK CLUB ANNUAL AWARD 2022


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