MORE to BROWSE - Pages that might be of Interest

Wednesday 23 February 2022

Rob Samborn and The Prisoner of Paradise my Coffee Pot Guest


Welcome to my Blog!
Wander through wonderful worlds
real and fictional,
meet interesting people,
visit exciting places
and find a few good books
to enjoy along the way!

The Prisoner of Paradise is my debut novel, published by TouchPoint Press.

When Nick & Julia O’Connor, an American couple, travel to Venice, Italy on holiday, Nick comes to believe that his true soul mate is not his wife, but a woman trapped in the world’s largest oil painting.

Though Julia worries he suffers from delusions, Nick discovers a secret society that has developed a method of extracting people’s souls whom they deem to be evil. They imprison those souls in Paradise, painted by Jacopo Tintoretto in the 16th century. Nick goes on a quest to save his soul mate from eternal purgatory but liberating her means freeing all the souls—something the secret society will never let happen.

 

The whole of the book is set in Venice. Constructed of 120 manmade islands and 177 canals, Venice is like nowhere else on Earth and is not only a location in The Prisoner of Paradise, but a character.

At times a protagonist and other times an antagonist, Nick and Julia are often lost in the maze-like city, as they need to navigate the bridges and narrow alleys as much as they need to navigate the multiple obstacles put in the way of their goals.

Venice is one of the most picturesque cities on the planet, from the world-famous gondoliers and architecture to tiny squares surrounded by five-hundred-year-old buildings that are sinking in a slow death. Julia is a photographer and never fails to capture a moment.

As the characters delve deeper in their adventure, they explore additional locations in Venice, including these incredible places:

The Doge’s Palace

 

Known in Italian as Il Palazzo Ducale, The Doge’s Palace is a thousand-year-old building located on the edge of St. Mark’s Square. Now a museum, it was once the seat of government of the Venetian Republic. It was home to the doge (the elected leader), as well as the meeting place for senators, making it a combination of the United States Capitol Building and the White House—but four times as old.

Salvatore della Porta, the antagonist of the book, is the director of the museum. He takes his job incredibly seriously and treats the building like his treasured home—if not castle.

The Doge’s Palace is also the location of the painting Paradise. Spanning an entire wall of the Great Council Room, what used to be the largest room in all of Europe, Paradise is seventy-five feet wide by forty feet high, situated twelve feet off the floor.

The massive room is covered in Renaissance art and enthralls Nick and Julia, who have never seen anything like it.

But it’s Paradise—or more specifically, a woman in Paradise—who mesmerizes Nick.

The Biennale

The Venice Biennale is the location and name of a biannual art exhibition hosting the world’s top contemporary art. Established in 1895, it’s one of the most prestigious art events in the world.

Since the Biennale features contemporary art—much of it experimental and avant-garde—it’s juxtaposed with the omnipresent Renaissance art located elsewhere in the city

Venice is a city of dualities and duality is very much a theme of the book.

Julia is a fine arts photographer with a photograph in the exhibition. She’s over the moon about this potential leap forward in her career, but when she meets with a New York gallery owner, Nick is lured to the woman in Paradise

Poveglia Island

Image attribution: Marco Usan, CC BY 3.0
<https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0>,
via Wikimedia Commons

Nestled in the Venetian Lagoon between Venice and the Italian mainland, Poveglia Island is known as the world’s most haunted island. Infamous for its abandoned mental institution, Poveglia is even more notorious for housing the world’s first plague hospital and quarantine building for the plague-ravaged terminally ill.

Venice is no stranger to plagues. Venetians have been using masks for centuries and the word ‘quarantine’ comes from the Venetian word for ‘forty,’ which was the number of days required for quarantine to avoid the spread of illness.

At one point in the book, Nick is on the run with a man who has questionable motives. That man takes Nick to Poveglia to hide out and spend the night. Hiding amongst the ruins of a mental institution that used to be a plague hospital on the world’s most haunted island isn’t exactly a luxury resort.

To learn more about The Prisoner of Paradise or to find purchase locations, 

visit www.robsamborn.com.


About the book
The world’s largest oil painting. A 400-year-old murder. A disembodied whisper: “Amore mio.” My love.

Nick and Julia O’Connor’s dream trip to Venice collapses when a haunting voice reaches out to Nick from Tintoretto’s Paradise, a monumental depiction of Heaven. Convinced his delusions are the result of a concussion, Julia insists her husband see a doctor, though Nick is adamant the voice was real.

Blacking out in the museum, Nick flashes back to a life as a 16th century Venetian peasant swordsman. He recalls precisely who the voice belongs to: Isabella Scalfini, a married aristocrat he was tasked to seduce but with whom he instead found true love. A love stolen from them hundreds of years prior.

She implores Nick to liberate her from a powerful order of religious vigilantes who judge and sentence souls to the canvas for eternity. Releasing Isabella also means unleashing thousands of other imprisoned souls, all of which the order claims are evil.

As infatuation with a possible hallucination clouds his commitment to a present-day wife, Nick’s past self takes over. Wracked with guilt, he can no longer allow Isabella to remain tormented, despite the consequences. He must right an age-old wrong – destroy the painting and free his soul mate. But the order will eradicate anyone who threatens their ethereal prison and their control over Venice.

Trigger Warnings.
Violence, a rape scene, a torture scene.

Buy Links:

Apple Books: 
Barnes & Noble: 



About the Author 

In addition to being a novelist, Rob Samborn is a screenwriter, entrepreneur and avid traveler. He’s been to forty countries, lived in five of them and studied nine languages. As a restless spirit who can’t remember the last time he was bored, Rob is on a quest to explore the intricacies of our world and try his hand at a multitude of crafts; he’s also an accomplished artist and musician, as well as a budding furniture maker. A native New Yorker who lived in Los Angeles for twenty years, he now makes his home in Denver with his wife, daughter and dog. 

Social Media Links:

BookBub:
Amazon Author Page: 



Follow the Tour

Twitter Handle: @robsamborn @maryanneyarde
Hashtags: #HistoricalFiction #MagicalRealism #Thrillers #tintoretto #venice #UnlockThePast #BlogTour #CoffeePotBookClub



note: Helen has not yet read this title - it is on her TBR list though!

*** *** 

You might also like 

books written by Helen Hollick 

Website: https://helenhollick.net/

Amazon Author Page: https://viewauthor.at/HelenHollick 


~~ ~ ~ ~ 

The SEA WITCH VOYAGES
nautical adventures set during the Golden Age of Piracy

from Amazon :
If you liked
 Pirates Of The Caribbean?
then you'll love the Sea Witch Voyages!


ANTHOLOGIES

FREE ebook!
from Amazon :

Sunday 20 February 2022

Daughter of the King - Kerry Chaput my Monday Morning Coffee Pot Book Club Guest


Welcome to my Blog!
Wander through wonderful worlds
real and fictional,
meet interesting people,
visit exciting places
and find a few good books
to enjoy along the way!


When research takes you on your own adventure…

While researching my husband’s French-Canadian ancestry, I experienced the thrill of a main character in one of those dual timeline historicals, discovering secrets and wild stories like a little puzzle. His entire family is from Quebec, but no one knew where in France they emigrated from. I set out to surprise him with a Christmas present of his family tree. What I got instead were the makings of a historical fiction series. 

Quebec keeps amazing records. As I read about the history of French Canada, I discovered stories of the first settlers and original families that left France for a life in the new world. I also discovered the story of the Filles du Roi (Daughters of the King) — poor, orphaned women King Louis XIV paid to help populate Canada. I began researching these women and knew instantly that I was meant to write a book about them. I carefully followed the records in my husband’s family, hoping to find that little fleur-de-lis symbol to indicate that my own daughters are descended from one of these amazing women. 

I didn’t find one. I found thirty-three. 

I was ecstatic to discover that much of his family came from Normandy, as my husband is a WWII buff and D-Day is the part of the war that most intrigues him. It got me thinking — is our history somehow in our DNA? Did he care about that location because he knew it meant something special to his past? I don’t know, but it felt serendipitous. 

Caught on one side of his ancestral line, I asked about his family. Turns out that there was a secret affair somewhere along the line and someone’s father wasn’t their real father! Well, color me interested. I poked around to older family members and discovered that they knew of this affair and provided the name of the man who was most likely the father (a local politician from their town). I set to work researching this man and I was blown away to see images of him and his son who look extremely similar to my husband’s family. I researched that man’s line (also from Quebec) and discovered dozens more Filles du Roi. I was able to trace that side all the way back to the royal family of Brittany, kings and queens and dukes and duchesses. This line included Julius Caesar and Constantine. I wrote until my hands cramped! 

I learned about La Rochelle, and the Huguenots that suffered tremendously. Several Filles du Roi decided to convert from Protestantism to Catholicism so they could become Daughters of the King and start a new life in Canada. I imagined how incredibly brave they must have been. I knew that my protagonist would be a Huguenot from La Rochelle. So began research into the wars of religion and theology as my main character (Isabelle) started to come to life. Research for this novel was more like a fact-finding adventure about our family. I have this wonderful knowledge to carry on to my daughters about the incredible women they are descended from. It kept the story close to my heart and writing the book meaningful to me. 

Daughter of the King is book one of the Defying the Crown Series. Isabelle’s adventure is also my own adventure through our fascinating past. If you haven’t searched your genealogy yet, what are you waiting for? You never know what you’ll find…


About Daughter of the King

La Rochelle France, 1661. Fierce Protestant Isabelle is desperate to escape persecution by the Catholic King. Isabelle is tortured and harassed, her people forced to convert to the religion that rules the land. She risks her life by helping her fellow Protestants, which is forbidden by the powers of France. She accepts her fate — until she meets a handsome Catholic soldier who makes her question everything.

She fights off an attack by a nobleman, and the only way to save herself is to flee to the colony of Canada as a Daughter of the King. She can have money, protection and a new life — if she adopts the religion she’s spent a lifetime fighting. She must leave her homeland and the promises of her past. In the wild land of Canada, Isabelle finds that her search for love and faith has just begun. 

Based on the incredible true story of the French orphans who settled Canada, Daughter of the King is a sweeping tale of one young woman’s fight for true freedom. Kerry Chaput brings the past to life, expertly weaving a gripping saga with vivid historical details. Jump back in time on a thrilling adventure with an unforgettable heroine.

Trigger Warning:
Violence, sexual assault.

Buy
Read for free with #KindleUnlimited subscription.





Born in California wine country, Kerry Chaput began writing shortly after earning her Doctorate degree. Her love of storytelling began with a food blog and developed over the years to writing historical fiction novels. Raised by a teacher of US history, she has always been fascinated by tales from our past and is forever intrigued by the untold stories of brave women. She lives in beautiful Bend, Oregon with her husband, two daughters, and two rescue pups. She can often be found on hiking trails or in coffee shops. 

Social Media Links:



Follow the Tour
Twitter Handle: @ChaputKerry @maryanneyarde
Hashtags: #HistoricalFiction #kerrywrites #BlogTour #CoffeePotBookClub
Tour Schedule: 



note: Helen has not yet read this title - it is on her TBR list though!

*** *** 

You might also like 

books written by Helen Hollick 

Website: https://helenhollick.net/

Amazon Author Page: https://viewauthor.at/HelenHollick 


The Jan Christopher Cosy Mysteries
set in the 1970s

from Amazon :
https://getbook.at/MirrorMurder


With RICHARD TEARLE




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Thursday 17 February 2022

My Coffee Pot Book Club Guest Today: Juliane Weber takes us to Ireland...


Welcome to my Blog!
Wander through wonderful worlds
real and fictional,
meet interesting people,
visit exciting places
and find a few good books
to enjoy along the way!

Location, location, location… 

When I first decided I would write a novel, I had only the vague notion that I would write historical fiction, but no exact idea of when or where the story would take place. In my search for inspiration, I eventually came across the Irish Famine, which immediately appealed to me as a setting for my book. I liked the idea of the 19th century and was particularly drawn to Ireland’s beautiful scenery and its myths and legends, which I thought would make a nice backdrop for my hypothetical novel. 


I had found my setting at last! 

But where exactly in Ireland to have my story unfold? After some background reading, I decided to set the novel in Ulster Province, as this fairly prosperous region was less severely affected by the Famine than some other areas in Ireland, although it was by no means spared! While I didn’t want to downplay the horrors of the Famine, I wanted to avoid the book becoming overly gloomy. 

The Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology further drew me to Ulster Province. Tales such as those of the hero CĂș Chulainn and his horse-drawn chariot would presumably have been widely known in the region, allowing me to include bits of such folklore throughout the book. Having thus decided on Ulster Province, I further narrowed down the setting to County Tyrone, which is home to some of the best farmland in Ireland—again, to prevent the overall tone of the novel becoming too morose. 

 
A bit of city living

Although I had decided on County Tyrone as the main setting of my novel, I also wanted to be able to examine Anglo-Irish relations in 19th century Ireland more closely, as well as to include the British government’s response to the Famine in more detail than might be possible from a rural perspective. For these and other reasons I chose an Englishman and an Irishwoman to be my main characters, both of the upper classes, allowing them access to easy travelling. In Under the Emerald Sky, the protagonists visit Dublin, where troops of the British Army were stationed, giving the reader some idea of the political situation at the time, as well as providing some interesting anecdotes of life in 19th century Dublin. While Under the Emerald Sky takes place over the two years preceding the Famine, the potato harvest actually starts to fail in the second book of the series. A return trip to Dublin in that book allows Quin to attend the Mansion House Meeting in October 1845, which was one of the earliest gatherings to discuss the British government’s response to the blight, setting the scene for ongoing relief efforts (or the lack thereof…). 


Part of the second book of the series also takes place in London, where Quin visits his family after the first failed potato harvest. I had wanted to include such a trip to better explore the prevailing opinions of the English regarding the Irish Famine, on the home front as it were. Besides this, 19th century London was a hub of modern activity and housed many of the most famous thinkers of the time, including scientists. Being a scientist myself, I was fascinated to read about the scientific discoveries made in the 1840s, immediately making me want to include some scientific anecdotes in the second book, which I hope will be both entertaining and enlightening to the reader.
 
Having carefully chosen these and other locations has allowed me to explore multiple facets of the complex political, social and agrarian factors that contributed to the disaster that was the Great Famine. At the heart of the tragedy, though, are not the sprawling manor houses scattered throughout Ireland, nor the aristocrats’ haunts in Dublin or London, but those homes that were stashed away at the far edges of the Irish estates, out of sight of the rich landlords—cottages that often had no windows or chimneys and housed whole families and their animals, all of whom were dependent on the potatoes grown on tiny plots of land. These are the people who suffered most during the Famine, even as Ireland continued to export massive amounts of food, and it is their suffering that should not be forgotten. 

I hope that my book(s) will in some way keep their memory alive. 

Thank you, Helen, for letting me share a little about my writing on your blog today. 

Juliane 
[my pleasure Juliane]

Under the Emerald Sky
The Irish Fortune Series, Book 1

 

He’s come to Ireland to escape his past. She’s trying to run from her future.

It's 1843 and the English nobleman Quinton Williams has come to Ireland to oversee the running of his father’s ailing estate and escape his painful past. Here he meets the alluring Alannah O’Neill, whose Irish family is one of few to have retained ownership of their land, the rest having been supplanted by the English over the course of the country's bloody history. Finding herself drawn to the handsome Englishman, Alannah offers to help Quin communicate with the estate’s Gaelic-speaking tenants, as much to assist him as to counter her own ennui. Aware of her controlling brother’s hostility towards the English, she keeps her growing relationship with Quin a secret – a secret that cannot, however, be kept for long from those who dream of ridding Ireland of her English oppressors.

Among the stark contrasts that separate the rich few from the plentiful poor, Under the Emerald Sky is a tale of love and betrayal in a land teetering on the brink of disaster - the Great Famine that would forever change the course of Ireland's history.

Trigger Warnings:
Violence, sexual content.


Buy Links:

This novel is available to read for free with #KindleUnlimited subscription.

Universal Book Link: https://books2read.com/u/4DxvLA





About the author:

 

Juliane is actually a scientist. She holds degrees in physiology and zoology, including a PhD in physiology. During her studies she realised, however, that her passion lay not in conducting scientific research herself, but in writing about it. Thus began her career as a medical writer, where she took on all manner of writing and editing tasks, in the process honing her writing skills, until she finally plucked up the courage to write her first historical novel, Under the Emerald Sky. The book is the first in The Irish Fortune Series, which is set in 19th century Ireland around the time of the Great Famine.

Juliane lives with her husband and two sons in Hamelin, Germany, the town made famous by the story of the Pied Piper.

Social Media Links:








Follow the tour


Twitter @Writer_JW @maryanneyarde
Hashtags: #HistoricalFiction #HistoricalRomance #Ireland 
#IrishHistory #GreatFamine #BlogTour #CoffeePotBookClub

Tour Schedule Page: 



note: Helen has not yet read this title - it is on her TBR list though!

*** *** 

You might also like 

books written by Helen Hollick 

Website: https://helenhollick.net/

Amazon Author Page: https://viewauthor.at/HelenHollick 

Cosy Mysteries

The Jan Christopher Cosy Mysteries
set in the 1970s

from Amazon :
https://getbook.at/MirrorMurder


The SEA WITCH VOYAGES
nautical adventures set during the Golden Age of Piracy

from Amazon :
If you liked
 Pirates Of The Caribbean?
then you'll love the Sea Witch Voyages!



A prequel novella - how Jesamiah Acorne became a pirate 
new edition with new additional scenes
and now in paperback and e-book from Amazon :


Plus many more...
fiction, non-fiction

~ ~  ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 

Thursday 10 February 2022

Please welcome my Coffee Pot Guest - Mercedes Rochelle



Welcome to my Blog!
Wander through wonderful worlds
real and fictional,
meet interesting people,
visit exciting places
and find a few good books
to enjoy along the way!


    RICHARD II'S MANY CHALLENGES
    by Mercedes Rochelle

    As the old biblical saying goes, "Woe to thee, O land, when thy king is a child". The stresses on the country are easy to see, but no one seems to talk about how difficult it was to BE that child. Growing up without a (or at least, an active) father must have been compounded by all the expectations heaped upon that little head. In Richard's case, he wasn't even the first-born son. His elder brother, Edward, had died at the age of five just before his family's return to England in 1371; Richard was not quite four. There were to be no more children, so the pressure was on.

    Both Edward, the Black Prince and the ailing Edward III had real concerns about the succession. Primogeniture, as we know it, was not yet the law of the land. Young Richard had three uncles, and John of Gaunt, the next brother after Edward had already made plenty of enemies. So not only did the Black Prince on his deathbed oblige everyone to swear to support his son, King Edward is said to have put together an entail delineating the succession along male lines. He declared Richard the next heir and bypassed the descendants from his second son Lionel (already dead) through the daughter. According to historian Michael Bennett, because of Gaunt's unpopularity the entail was kept secret from the general public. How many copies were made was unknown, for a badly burned original (from the Cotton Library fire of 1731) wasn't even discovered until the 20th century. Surely all of Edward III's descendants knew about it. 

    Richard was ten years old when he was crowned king. Apparently because so many people feared that Gaunt would seize the crown for himself, there was no regency. The business of government was conducted by a Continual Council, at least until the Peasants' Revolt broke out in 1381. By then Richard was fourteen, and he suddenly found himself thrust into a position of leadership. Gaunt was in Scotland, the next uncle Edmund Langley was on his way to Portugal, and the youngest uncle Thomas of Woodstock was in Wales. The chancellor, Archbishop Sudbury, immediately resigned his post—not that he was fit for the job in the first place. There was no army to call on—only the soldiers manning the Tower of London. Richard had to face the marauding rebels on his own, and with a couple of false starts along the way, he ultimately manage to save London from their depredations. He had proved himself worthy of the name Plantagenet.

    Richard II meeting the rebels from Jean Froissart,
    Chroniques, 154v, 12148 (Wikipedia)

    One would think that his courage would have impressed his elders. Not a whit. Promises had been made along the way that couldn't be kept, and Richard was to blame for making them—not that anybody else had a better idea. The king was dragged along as the government reasserted itself, holding judgement on the rebels who felt themselves betrayed. Many ringleaders were hanged and the king was held responsible. His moment of glory was fleeting and now he was on the defensive. 

    Richard kept his few friends and advisors close, making them the target of jealous and unscrupulous magnates. The most unscrupulous of all was Richard's uncle Thomas of Woodstock, made Duke of Gloucester in 1385. The new title—which he felt he deserved—did nothing to counteract his conviction that the king was badly advised. As soon as John of Gaunt left the country to pursue the crown of Castile, Gloucester went on the offensive. Gathering together a powerful faction led by himself, the Earl of Arundel, and the Earl of Warwick, Gloucester "appealed" (accused) Richard's favorites, initiating a legal procedure to drive them from the king's presence. (Even he couldn't attack the king directly.) The trio became known as the Lords Appellant, and were soon joined by Henry Bolingbroke and Thomas Mowbray. Gaining steam, their scheme was extravagantly successful, culminating in the Merciless Parliament of 1388. By the time the dust settled, eight of Richard's friends and favorites had been put to death, three had fled the country, and over forty others had been ejected from court. The king was all alone, and friendless. Except for his queen. 

    Nonetheless, Richard trusted in his special eminence. He was an anointed king, after all, and nobody could take that from him. After licking his wounds for a year, he came back stronger and wiser, declaring his majority and taking his place back at the head of the government. The Lords Appellant could do nothing against him, and they had pretty much lost interest anyway. Their job was done. 

    For the next seven years, England was quiet and prosperous. As professor Hutchison would say, political executioners were unemployed. But suddenly, without warning, Richard launched a brutal revenge against the Lords Appellant, throwing his government into a tailspin. What happened? Why ruin a good thing? Historians have been baffled ever since. Perhaps the death of his queen removed any restraint over his bad tendencies. Some think the king went insane; others wondered if he was planning his revenge all along and just waited for the right moment. It's possible that the Duke of Gloucester was fomenting trouble again. He got his "just desserts", and it's possible that Richard would have gotten away with his private retribution except that he didn't stop there.

    Arrest of the Duke of Gloucester,
    BL Harley 4380, f. 181v (
    Creative Commons license)

    For the last three years of his reign, King Richard exhibited an incredible paranoia, fearing retaliation at any moment and practically holding the whole populace responsible for his earlier humiliation. This period of his reign is usually called his Tyranny. He collected over 600 Cheshire archers as his personal bodyguard (who terrorized the country wherever they went). He imposed fines on whole communities and slapped them with "blank charters" to be filled in at his discretion if they caused any trouble. He initiated forced loans to pay for his upcoming campaign to Ireland (though he was not the first nor the last king to do so). Once he exiled Henry Bolingbroke and took possession of the Lancaster endowments, he went too far. For the second time in his life Richard found himself alone and abandoned—with the exception of a handful of supporters. This time there would be no coming back. The king’s experiment with absolute monarchy was a failure, not to be revived until Henry VIII applied it to “perfection”.

     

    A King Under Siege (The Plantagenet Legacy, Book 1)
    By Mercedes Rochelle
    Audio Narrated by Kevin E. Green

    Richard II found himself under siege not once, but twice in his minority. Crowned king at age ten, he was only fourteen when the Peasants' Revolt terrorized London. But he proved himself every bit the Plantagenet successor, facing Wat Tyler and the rebels when all seemed lost. Alas, his triumph was short-lived, and for the next ten years he struggled to assert himself against his uncles and increasingly hostile nobles. Just like in the days of his great-grandfather Edward II, vengeful magnates strove to separate him from his friends and advisors, and even threatened to depose him if he refused to do their bidding. The Lords Appellant, as they came to be known, purged the royal household with the help of the Merciless Parliament. They murdered his closest allies, leaving the King alone and defenseless. He would never forget his humiliation at the hands of his subjects. Richard's inability to protect his adherents would haunt him for the rest of his life, and he vowed that next time, retribution would be his.

    Buy the Book

    Amazon UK: 
    Amazon US: 
    Amazon CA: 
    Amazon AU: 
    Barnes and Noble: 


    About the Author

    Mercedes Rochelle is an ardent lover of medieval history, and has channeled this interest into fiction writing. Her first four books cover eleventh-century Britain and events surrounding the Norman Conquest of England. The next series is called The Plantagenet Legacy about the struggles and abdication of Richard II, leading to the troubled reigns of the Lancastrian Kings. She also writes a blog: HistoricalBritainBlog.com to explore the history behind the story. Born in St. Louis, MO, she received by BA in Literature at the Univ. of Missouri St.Louis in 1979 then moved to New York in 1982 while in her mid-20s to “see the world”. The search hasn’t ended! Today she lives in Sergeantsville, NJ with her husband in a log home they had built themselves.

    Social Media Links:

    Amazon Author Page: 


    Follow The Tour


    Twitter @authorRochelle @maryanneyarde
    Hashtags: #HistoricalFiction #RichardII #Plantagenets 
    #BlogTour 
    #CoffeePotBookClub Tour Schedule Page:


    note: Helen has not yet read this title - it is on her TBR list though!

    *** *** 

    You might also like 

    books written by Helen Hollick 

    Website: https://helenhollick.net/

    Amazon Author Page: https://viewauthor.at/HelenHollick 


    ~~ ~ ~ ~ 
    THE SAXON SERIES
    the events that led to 1066
    the Battle of Hastings

    1066 - the events that led to the
    Battle of Hastings
    Harold the King (UK edition)
    I Am The Chosen King (US/Canada edition)
    1066 Turned Upside Down -
    an anthology of alternative stories


    KING ARTHUR

    A post-Roman warlord and the story
    of King Arthur
    The boy who became a man
    The Man who became a King
    The King who became a legend
    Book One of the Pendragon's Banner Trilogy
    The Kingmaking (UK/world edition - US/Canada edition)


    includes a story by Mercedes Rochelle


    Plus many more...
    fiction, non-fiction

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